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Arlington Historic Home and Gardens

Arlington Historic Home and Gardens

From the Encylopedia of Alabama:Located in the Birmingham community of Elyton, Arlington Antebellum Home and Gardens is a historic house and grounds that are open to the public. The house, an excellent example of Greek Revival architecture, is the only antebellum mansion in the city and displays items relating to nineteenth-century life. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Jefferson County in 1970.The Arlington Antebellum Home and Gardens in old Arlington Antebellum Home and GardensThe original, modest four-room house on the site of what is now Arlington was constructed in 1822 by Stephen Hall, a settler from Georgia. The current house was constructed after 1842 by jurist and legislator William S. Mudd, who bought Hall’s property, which included the home, outbuildings, and 16 surrounding acres, at public auction for $600. Mudd erected a sprawling mansion, which he called The Grove, on the property, and he and his wife, Florence Earle Mudd, raised nine children there. During the Civil War, General James H. Wilson, who conducted the largest Union raid into Alabama in the spring of 1865, established his headquarters at Arlington while planning his raid to destroy Confederate factories and munitions at Selma. Thus, the house emerged from the war unscathed.William S. Mudd (1816-1884) came to Alabama from William S. MuddAfter Mudd’s death in 1884, Arlington was sold to prominent industrialist Henry F. DeBardeleben, who lived in it until 1884, when he sold

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